• Configure High Availability using Unisphere

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    Configure High Availability using Unisphere

    Link aggregation (physical deployments only)

    The storage system provides network high availability or redundancy by using link aggregation. With link aggregation, there can be two to four Ethernet port combinations in one logical link. Each storage processor (SP) must have the same type and number of Ethernet ports. The loss of a network connection does not initiate failover to the peer SP, avoiding an outage. The switch automatically moves traffic to the remaining ports in the link aggregation if the path to one port fails. When they connection is restored, the switch adds the failed port back to the link aggregation group and resumes use of the port. You can aggregate ports that are on the same IO module, different IO modules, or you can aggregate IO module and onboard Ethernet ports together (such as the onboard 10GbE BaseT port with the 10GbE Optical CNA ports). Link aggregation also allows the system to load-balance host traffic, providing better performance.

    Ports must have the same MTU size in order to be aggregated. Linked ports must connect to the same logical switch, and the switch must be configured to use the IEEE 802.3ad standard Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP). Link Aggregation should also be configured at the host level to provide resiliency against port or cable failures. Depending on the vendor, this may also be referred to as trunking, bonding, or NIC teaming. Refer to your switch vendor's documentation for more information about using LACP.

    Note:  Link aggregation can only be used for NAS server, file replication, and file import interfaces; you cannot aggregate Ethernet ports that have iSCSI configured.

    Link aggregation has the following advantages:

    • High availability of network paths to and from the storage system — If one physical port of an aggregated port fails, the system does not lose connectivity.
    • Possible increased overall throughput — This is because multiple physical ports are bonded into one logical port.
    • Load balancing across linked ports — Network traffic is distributed between multiple physical ports.

    Create a link aggregation

    Aggregate two or more ports together for high availability.

    Before you begin

    Ports must have the same MTU size in order to be aggregated. Linked ports must connect to the same logical switch, and the switch must be configured to use the IEEE 802.3ad standard Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP).

    Note:  Link aggregation can only be used for NAS server, file replication, and file import interfaces; you cannot aggregate Ethernet ports that have iSCSI configured.
    Procedure
    1. Under Settings, select Access > High Availability
    2. Under Link aggregations, select the Add icon.
    3. Select the Ethernet ports you want to add to the link aggregation.

    Change a link aggregation

    Add or remove ports from a link aggregation.

    Before you begin

    You cannot edit a link aggregation that is already part of a fail safe network (FSN). You must first remove that link aggregation from the FSN in order to do so. You cannot remove the master/primary port from a link aggregation. You cannot add a port to the link aggregation that is already independently part of an FSN.

    Ports must have the same MTU size in order to be aggregated. Linked ports must connect to the same logical switch, and the switch must be configured to use the IEEE 802.3ad standard Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP).

    Procedure
    1. Under Settings, select Access > High Availability.
    2. Under Link aggregations, select an existing link aggregation and click the Edit icon.
      1. Select a non-primary port and click the Delete icon to remove it from the link aggregation.
        Note:  Removing a port from a link aggregation with only two ports will destroy the link aggregation.
      2. Alternatively, click the Add icon and select a new port to add to the link aggregation.
      3. Optionally, change the MTU size for the link aggregation (changes all ports at once).
    3. Click Apply after each change before you make another modification.

    Fail-safe networking

    Learn about Fail-safe networking (FSN).

    A Fail-Safe Network (FSN) is a high-availability feature that extends link failover into the network by providing switch-level redundancy. An FSN appears as a single link with a single MAC address and potentially multiple IP addresses. An FSN can be a port, a link aggregation, or any combination of the two. An FSN adds an extra layer of availability to link aggregations alone. Link aggregations provide availability in the event of a port failure. FSNs provide availability in the event of a switch failure. Each port or link aggregation is considered as a single connection. Only one connection in an FSN is active at a time. All the connections making up the FSN share a single hardware (MAC) address.

    If the system detects a failure of the active connection, it will automatically switch to the standby connection in the FSN. That new connection assumes the network identity of the failed connection, until the primary connection is available again. You can designate which connection is the primary port/connection. To ensure connectivity in the event of a hardware failure, create FSN devices on multiple I/O modules or onboard ports. The FSN components are connected to different switches. If the network switch for the active connection fails, the FSN fails over to a connection using a different switch, thus extending link failover out into the network.

    When replicating from one Unity system to another, configure the FSN the same way on both systems as a best practice. You will need to manually configure the FSN on the destination before setting up replication. Otherwise, if you set up the FSN on the destination after replication is configured, you will need to use the Override address option to select the FSN as the interface for the destination NAS server.

    Note:  A NAS server IP interface should be build on the highest level logical device. If you want to repurpose a port or link aggregation currently used as a NAS server IP interface for an FSN, you will need to remove the IP interface from the NAS server, create the FSN, and reassign the IP interface to the FSN device.

    Create a fail-safe network

    Learn how to create a fail-safe network.

    Before you begin

    If you want to add a link aggregation to this FSN, be sure to create that link aggregation first.

    FSN provides additional protection and redundancy over link aggregation by providing high availability in the event of a switch failure.
    Procedure
    1. Under Settings, select Access > High Availability
    2. Under Fail Safe Networking, click the Add icon.
    3. Select two or more ports to add to the Fail Safe Network. You can choose standalone ports or link aggregations, or any combination of the two.
    4. Select the Primary Port for the FSN and click Apply.

    Change an FSN

    Learn how to add or remove links to an existing fail-safe network.

    Before you begin

    You cannot remove a primary port from an FSN.

    Procedure
    1. Under Settings, select Access > High Availability.
    2. Under Fail Safe Networking, select the FSN for which you want to add or remove ports or link aggregations and click the Edit icon.
    3. Select a non-primary port and click the Delete icon to remove it from the FSN. Alternatively, click the Add icon and select a new port or link aggregation to add to the FSN. Click Apply after each add or delete change before you make another modification.

    Repurpose a NAS Ethernet port for FSN or link aggregation

    Before you begin
    Note:  If you only have one interface currently set up for your NAS server, the host connection will experience downtime during this repurpose process.

    If you have already dedicated an Ethernet port as an interface for a NAS server, but would like to repurpose it for fail-safe networking (FSN) or link aggregation (LA), you will need to deconstruct the network port, assign it to a LA or FSN, and then build the NAS server on top of the new FSN device.

    Procedure
    1. Remove the IP interface from the NAS server for the port you would like to use in the FSN.
    2. Optionally, create the Link Aggregation to be included in the FSN.
    3. Create an FSN using the desired ports and/or link aggregations.
    4. Recreate the IP interface for the NAS server on top of the FSN device.